Back to School: Corn Syrup

Here is the other article I wrote that went down with our web server crash. :-)

 

This is bound to be one of the most controversial posts I will write here on this blog. (edit October 3, 2011: No, this isn’t going to be my most controversial post. My post controversial will be my post on sugar I plan to write in the near future. In it I will jump and down on a lot of people’s sweet teeth. :P) So, with fear and tremblin’, here is the spill on corn syrup. While most of these articles refer to “high fructose” corn syrup, I am also warning you of corn syrup in general. It is dangerous as well. Just clarifying as someone recently said, “but it isn’t high fructose corn syrup!” There’s really no difference in the long-lasting effects.

The Murky World of High Fructose Corn Syrup explains the process in which corn syrup is derived. Yew.

Soft Drinks, is a interesting and sobering article about one of the main corn syrup drinks Americans drink.

Interestingly, an article about High Fructose Corn Syrup by the San Francisco Chronicle.

Another Interesting article on Corn Syrup. And yet another one by the same other, 5 Reasons I Avoid High Fructose Corn Syrup. And the last in the series.

 

Here is a cute ‘commercial’ on High Fructose Corn Syrup that about sums everything up:

 

Here is the other article I wrote that went down with our web server crash. :-)

 

This is bound to be one of the most controversial posts I will write here on this blog. (edit October 3, 2011: No, this isn’t going to be my most controversial post. My post controversial will be my post on sugar I plan to write in the near future. In it I will jump and down on a lot of people’s sweet teeth. :P) So, with fear and tremblin’, here is the spill on corn syrup. While most of these articles refer to “high fructose” corn syrup, I am also warning you of corn syrup in general. It is dangerous as well. Just clarifying as someone recently said, “but it isn’t high fructose corn syrup!” There’s really no difference in the long-lasting effects.

The Murky World of High Fructose Corn Syrup explains the process in which corn syrup is derived. Yew.

Soft Drinks, is a interesting and sobering article about one of the main corn syrup drinks Americans drink.

Interestingly, an article about High Fructose Corn Syrup by the San Francisco Chronicle.

Another Interesting article on Corn Syrup. And yet another one by the same other, 5 Reasons I Avoid High Fructose Corn Syrup. And the last in the series.

 

 

 

Back to School: GMO

 

I posted this awhile back and then our web server crashed. So, here it is again. :-)

 

Introduction: ;-)

I’m going to be sharing about a couple things that our family has learned a lot about within the last few months and have encouraged us to be much more health-conscious about what we put in our mouth. I’m going to be posting link to articles on GMOs and corn syrup and the harmful effects of both. The facts are somewhat overwhelming and the solution seems…well, rather depressing.

For us, our solution is we’re trying to grow our own food. God has blessed us with property and so we are studying, planning and preparing to provide our own food.

A question I have to remind myself of is “is this temporary delicious thing (drink, snack, dessert) worth the poison that is in it?” Yeah, I am that hard on myself. I’m hard on myself because the consequences and effects of the corn syrup and GMOs are sobering as you will see for yourself in the videos and articles. It took something hard to get me to stop drinking McDonald’s coffee and certain soft drinks and I already did that so rarely because it is expensive. :-) And Braum’s eggnog? Wow, that was hard to give up this last holiday season (Thanksgiving through Christmas is eggnog time in our family), because I love their eggnog. But after reading the label and seeing it was full of high fructose corn syrup and regular corn syrup, I decided I could do without. I’m saying that because I want you to know it isn’t me just trying to preach something I don’t live. It’s hard to resist a “just every once an awhile” sweet something. :-) I’m learning that homemade goodies with wholesome sweeteners such as honey and sugar usually are better, tastier…and I can eat them without feelin’ guilty. ;-)

Two things that really got me to change and reform my thoughts on GMOs and Corn Syrup:

1. Both have been proven to contribute significantly to infertility and impotence. Ouch. Since I want to be able to have children some day, this piece of information highly motivated me to change.

2. Once these are in your system, they are there. To stay. These harmful, damaging substances which cause all kinds of disease, food allergies, etc. remain in my body for the rest of my life? Um, no thanks. :-)

With that here is the spill on GMOs. I hope you’ll take the time to read and at least watch the video down below. Be sure to check out the GMO shopping guide!

Here is “just” 50 harmful effects of GMOs on humans, land and animals. Rather shocking. Scroll down to see the list.

Everything You HAVE TO KNOW about Dangerous Genetically Modified Foods from Jeffrey Smith on Vimeo.

You heard about Monsanto from the video. Here is a brief article about them.

Here is a list of 3 approved GMOs that have been linked to organ damage.

Seeds of Deception is run by Jeffrey Smith (he also has written a book with the same name!). There is loads of information on his website, but here is an article on The Health Risks of GMO. And why the FDA is not protecting us.

So, now that you’re shocked, dismayed, paranoid and clueless as to what to do…here is some hope. :-)

Here is a non GMO shopping guide for free.

 

And here is an article of practical ways to fight GMOs.

 

I didn’t mean to make anyone scared. I’m merely trying to inform people as I was informed so we can change some things!

Feel free to question/comment! Your thoughts are welcomed! :)

How to: Sprouting Grain for Baking

I’m posting this to participate in GNOWFGLINS Simple Lives Thursday! :-)

 

How to Sprout Grain for Bread and Baking:

 

Several years ago, when I was around 17 or 18, I first attempted sprouting grain and making bread from it.  A bread-baking veteran of 8 years, I knew bread making quite well, but sprouted grain was beyond me at the time and I gave it up.  Last year, I started trying again. This time, I used our 2 dehydrators (we owned one and then someone gave us another one) and mesh sheets to dehydrate the grain instead of the oven.  I bought some grain from To Your Health Sprouted Grain to compare with mine.  I now have conquered the tricks of sprouted flour and now I am attempting a new challenge, sprouted sourdough bread.  We’ll see how it turns out. I made my own sourdough starter, and so far, so good. :-)

Sprouting the grain is a some of a hassle, but well worth it. I sprout hard red wheat and it makes the softest, flavor rich loaves.  Unsprouted, red wheat is dense and make small, unsavory loaves. I’m happy that it makes such a difference to sprout, since red wheat is so much more nutritious than white.

To sprout, I soak my grain in water for 12 hours.  This helps gets rid of all the bacteria and enzyme inhibitors in the grain.  After soaking, I drain the water and let it sprout all night. The sprouts should be barely visible, at the most an 1/8 of an inch, no more or else your bread will flop.  That’s teary-eyed experience speaking. ;-)

Then, I spread the grain on my dehydrator racks that have mesh screens on them and dehydrate at least 12 hours, sometimes more like 18. The grain has to be very dry.  That’s very important. I ruined a grain mill once. *ahem*  *blush*  Grind like normal whole grain and use for any recipe asking for flour.  Because it has a little bit more moister than other flour, you will have to use a little more than you use for whole wheat flour, but about equal amounts with white flour.

 

Benefits of Sprouted Grain:

Why is sprouting grain so good for you? For the answer, I’ll go to the “professionals”, those who can say it much more eloquently than I could ever try to.

Kelly the Kitchen Kop says that:

“Sprouting radically changes grains by:

  1. Changing the composition of starch molecules, converting them into vegetable sugars, so the body recognizes and digests sprouted grains as a vegetable.
  2. Enzymes are created that aid digestion, complex sugars are broken down which can eliminate painful gas, and vitamin and mineral levels increase.
  3. Sprouting neutralizes potent carcinogens and enzyme inhibitors, as well as an acid that inhibits absorption of calcium, magnesium, iron, copper and zinc.”

Nourished Kitchen blog says: “When examining the nutrient density of sprouted wheat to unsprouted wheat on a calorie-per-calorie basis, you’ll find that sprouted wheat contains four times the amount of niacin and nearly twice the amount of vitamin B6 and folate as unsprouted wheat; moreover, it contains more protein and fewer starches than non-sprouted grain and as a further boon, it is lower on the glycemic index making it more suitable for those suffering from blood sugar issues.”

There is lots of information from To Your Health Sprouted Flour and Summers Sprouted Flour Company, which are good places to buy sprouted grain/flour if you can’t do it yourself.  I’ve also heard a lot of research saying that those who are gluten-intolerant can eat sprouted flour products because of the enzymes being activated.

soaking_grain
Soaking the grain for 12 hours
sprouted_grain
A close up of the sprouted grain. It just needs to be slightly sprouted.
sprouted_grain
Spreading the wheat out on mesh sheets in the dehydrator
dehydrating_grain
The mesh sheets
dehydrating_grain
Our 2 dehydrators
sprouted_grain
Dried wheat after about 14 hours. Ready to grind!
sprouted_grain_flour
Fluffy ground flour waiting to be made into some delicious baked good!

 

 

Variations of Mexican Rancheros

On those “I-don’t-want-to-cook” days, it’s nice to have either a meal already prepared in the freezer (I need to work on that!) or a quick meal that is easy to prepare.  Here are a couple recipes that we have enjoyed recently for those days.

Preparation: Make Crispy Tortillas

-1 Packet of Food For Life Sprouted Corn Tortillas (you can use any corn tortillas; but these are good and better for ya!)

-Small skillet

-Butter/Olive/Lard

Heat skillet on medium high heat and add oil/butter/lard.  When hot, place 1 tortilla on the skillet and cook until lightly browned (notice: lightly). Flip over and repeat.  Place on a paper towel and dry before serving.  As soon as you have as many as you want, you can prepare your topping and devour! :-)

Huevos Rancheros

  • 12 free-range eggs
  • 1 cup raw milk/cream/sour cream
  • 1 tsp. Chili Powder
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1/4 tsp. Dried Chili Seeds
  • 1/4 tsp.  Cumin
  • 1 onion
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 4 ounces of raw milk cheddar cheese

Sauté onion and garlic in skillet until caramelized.  Beat eggs and milk/cream/sour cream in a large bowl adding the seasonings as you mix.  Pour over caramelized onions and cook until scrambled eggs are well done.  Add cheese and cook until melted.  To assemble: place tortillas on plates and then add eggs.  Finish off with hot sauce and/or sour cream.  Enjoy!

( Our family is kinda unusual (or so we’ve been told…) because we eat eggs for supper a lot.  We have “breakfast fer supper” quite a bit!)

Ground Beef Rancheros

  • 1 lb. grass-fed ground beef
  • 1 onion
  • 2 cloves of garlic
  • 1/2 T. Chili Powder
  • 1 t. Dried Chili Seeds
  • 1 t. Cumin
  • 1 t. Cilantro
  • 1 t. salt
  • 1 cup crushed/diced tomatoes
  • 1/4 cup hot sauce
  • 1/2 cup sour cream (optional)

Sauté gr. beef, onion and garlic until browned.  Add seasonings, tomatoes, hot sauce and sour cream and stir until combined.  Remove from heat.  Top prepared tortillas with gr. beef mixture and add sour cream/shredded cheese, hot sauce on top.  Serve with chips and salsa and a salad. Enjoy!

Witty Wednesday

 I’ve been trying to master sprouting wheat berries for bread.  I kept getting the sprouts way too long, and the bread flops.  Finally, the last batch I sprouted and dried worked! I made bread today (and rolls) and they turned out beautifully. I’m quite thrilled. I’ll post a recipe soon. And I hope to have a tutorial on how to sprout grains and an article on why it is so good for you!


“Whole grains contain phytic acid in the bran of the grain.  Phytic acid combines with key minerals, especially calcium, magnesium, copper, iron, and zinc and prevents their absorption in the intestinal tract. Soaking, fermenting, or sprouting the grain before cooking or baking will neutralize the phytic acid, releasing these nutrients for absorption. This process allows enzymes, lactobacilli and other helpful organisms to not only neutralize the phytic acid, but also to break down complex starches, irritating tannins and difficult-to-digest proteins including gluten. For many, this may lessen their sensitivity or allergic reactions to particular grains.  Everyone will benefit, nevertheless, from the release of nutrients and greater ease of digestion.”  ~ Sue Gregg

Hey there!

Welcome to Healthy, Witty and Whole!!! I’m so glad you stopped by.  Please let me know that you did, by leaving me a comment. 

I’m typing up some recipes that I’ve made recently to post here.  So in the meantime, please check out my recommened resources page up above as well as my “Other healthy food blogs” page to find people who are so much more ahead of me. :)

Notice that Food Renegade is teaching an online nutrition course for teenagers!  Check out the video below for more information.  It sounds really good.  I might do it if I wasn’t going through a nutrition course. :)


Real Food Nutrition & Health E-Course Intro from FoodRenegade on Vimeo.